Marine and freshwater harmful algal blooms

Cover of: Marine and freshwater harmful algal blooms |

Published by Nova Science Publishers in Hauppauge, N.Y .

Written in English

Read online

Subjects:

  • Algal blooms -- United States,
  • Algal blooms -- Health aspects,
  • Algal blooms -- Environmental aspects,
  • Algal blooms -- Research -- United States

Edition Notes

Includes index.

Book details

Statementeditor: Peter E. Williams.
ContributionsWilliams, Peter E.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQK568.B55 M37 2009
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23861437M
ISBN 109781607418382
LC Control Number2009041026
OCLC/WorldCa441143895

Download Marine and freshwater harmful algal blooms

Marine or saltwater harmful algal bloom (HAB) toxins can cause a variety of illnesses in humans and animals. Exposure to marine HAB toxins can occur through direct contact by swimming, breathing in aerosolized toxins (toxins in water turned into tiny airborne droplets or mist), or eating toxin-contaminated shellfish or finfish marine mammals, fish, and other.

An algal bloom or algae bloom is a rapid increase or accumulation in the population of algae in freshwater or marine water systems, and is often recognized by the discoloration in the water from their pigments.

The term algae encompasses many types of aquatic photosynthetic organisms, both macroscopic, multicellular organisms like seaweed and microscopic, unicellular. Read this excerpt from a book.

Harmful algal blooms, or HABS, occur when colonies of algae—simple plants that live in the sea and freshwater-grow out of control while producing toxic or harmful effects on people, fish, shellfish, marine mammals, and birds. The human illnesses caused by HABs, though rare, can be debilitating or even fatal.

In freshwater, a harmful algal bloom (HAB) is most commonly caused by small organisms called phytoplankton. The phytoplankton that commonly cause HABs are cyanobacteria, which use sunlight to create food. Some cyanobacteria produce toxins called cyanotoxins.

Depending on the specific chemical structure, cyanotoxins can be neurotoxins. What are Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs).

Marine and fresh waters teem with life, much of it microscopic and most of it beneficial and harmless. There are, however, some species of algae and cyanobacteria that cause harm, either through the production of potent toxins or through the accumulated biomass during their “blooms”.

This chapter highlights the key role of changes in nutrients; emphasizes estuarine/marine microalgal species, and includes information on some freshwater harmful algal blooms (HAB). It focuses mainly on microalgae and also presents several examples of macroalgae.

It explores some suggestions for advancement in the understanding of HAB and Cited by: 5. Marine and Freshwater Harmful Algal Blooms (Environmental Health - Physical, Chemical and Biological Factors) UK ed.

Edition by Peter E. Williams (Editor) ISBN ISBN X. Why is ISBN important. ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. While HABs and hypoxia occur in marine, estuarine, and freshwater ecosystems, the focus of this RFA will be on applications proposing innovative research on the prediction, prevention, control and mitigation of freshwater Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) as well as the drivers, life cycle patterns, and fate of and effects from less-common, less.

Marine and freshwater harmful algal blooms. [Peter E Williams;] This book describes the broad range of negative impacts that freshwater HAB toxins have on humans, HABs in the United States / Joint Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology --Plan for improving federal response to freshwater HABs.

An Overview of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) and Their Impacts in Freshwater and Marine Ecosystems Part 1: Summer Webinar Series to Build Awareness About Harmful Algal Blooms and Nutrient Pollution Tuesday, J pm – pm ET.

Speakers: Dr. Jennifer Graham, Research Hydrologist, U.S. Geological Survey. Freshwater Harmful Algal Blooms: Causes, Challenges, and Policy Considerations Congressional Research Service 1 Introduction Scientific research indicates that in recent years, the frequency and geographic distribution of harmful algal blooms (HABs) have been increasing nationally and globally.1 HABs can beFile Size: 1MB.

A harmful algal bloom (HAB) contains organisms (usually algae, hence the name) that can severely lower oxygen levels in natural waters, killing marine HABs are associated with algae-produced toxins.

Blooms can last from a few days to many months. After the bloom dies, the microbes which decompose the dead algae use up even more of the oxygen, which can.

Algal toxins or red-tide toxins produced during algal blooms are naturally derived toxic emerging contaminants that may kill organisms, including humans, through contaminated fish or seafood.

Other emerging contaminants produced either naturally or. Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are a major issue in marine, brackish, and freshwater systems worldwide (Hallegraeff, ).

Algal blooms are not a ne w. Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are a major issue in marine, brackish, and freshwater systems worldwide (Hallegraeff, ).Algal blooms are not a new phenomenon and occur naturally in fertile regions (such as the North American prairies), with historical accounts of these outbreaks dating back at least two millennia (Carmichael, ).However, with the increasing Cited by: Harmful algal blooms (HABs) have been the subject of many reports released by Mexican Federal Authorities along the Mexican Coast of the Gulf of Mexico Large Marine Ecosystem (MC-GoM-LME), but Author: Santosh Kumar Sarkar.

Chapter 4 Interactions of Harmful Algal Blooms, Molluscs, Crustaceans, and Other Invertebrates Leila Basti, Helene Hegaret, and Sandra E.

Shumway Chapter 5 Vulnerabilities of Marine Mammals to Harmful Algal Blooms Margaret H. Broadwater, Frances M. Van Dolah, and Spencer E. Fire Chapter 6 Interactions between Seabirds and Harmful Algal Blooms. Freshwater harmful algal blooms (HABs) are comprised of algae that either create health hazards for humans or animals through the production of toxins or bioactive compounds or that cause deterioration of water quality through the build-up of high biomass, which degrades aesthetic, ecological, and recreational : Peter E.

Williams. She earned her M.S. in Environmental Sciences from the University of Massachusetts in and her Ph.D. in Marine Science from the University of South Florida in She began her career with FWC-FWRI in the Harmful Algal Bloom program more than 20 years ago and has authored or co-authored 49 scientific papers and 4 book chapters related to.

Assessment of Freshwater Harmful Algal Blooms. Interagency Working Group on Harmful Algal Blooms, Hypoxia, and Human Health of the Joint Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology.

Washington, DC. Acknowledgements Many scientists and managers from federal and state agencies, universities, and researchFile Size: 9MB. Harmful Algal Blooms By Jennifer L. Graham Printed on recycled paper What Are Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). Freshwater and marine harmful algal blooms (HABs) can occur anytime water use is impaired due to excessive accumula-tions of algae.

HAB occurrence is affected by a complex set of physical, chemical, biological, hydrological, and meteorological. Harmful Algal Blooms: Impact and Response (Environmental Science, Engineering and Technology) UK ed. Edition by Vladimir Buteyko (Editor) ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important.

ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. For more in depth information on harmful algal blooms and their effects on sea turtles, please see the chapter entitled Harmful Algae and Biotoxins in the book Sea Turtle Health and Rehabilitation,Manire, C.A., T.M.

Norton, B.A. Stacy, C.J. Innis, and C.A. Harms (Editors) by J. Ross : Loggerhead Marinelife Center. Abstract.

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) pose threats to the environment, public health, and a variety of commercial interests and industries. A single bloom can lead to devastating outcomes, including large mortalities of marine organisms (e.g., fish kills); toxic contamination of filter-feeding organisms such as bivalve shellfish that subsequently enter the Cited by: 5.

HABs occur in all aquatic environments (e.g. freshwater, brackish and marine) and at all latitudes. In this paper, we focus specifically on the threat that blooms of harmful microalgae pose to the benefits (food supplies, economic activities, tourism and recreation) that the oceans and seas provide to human health and wellbeing (Figure 1).Cited by: Harmful algal blooms: A climate change co-stressor in marine and freshwater ecosystems - Open access January Andrew W.

Griffith | Christopher J. Gobler. Harmful algal blooms are one of the consequences of the human impact on aquatic ecosystems, particularly the process of eutrophication. They can cause a variety of deleterious effects, including the poisoning of fish and shellfish, habitat disruptions for many organisms, water discolouration, beach fouling, and even toxic effects for humans.

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) - blooms that cause fish kills, contaminate seafood with toxins, or cause human or ecological health impacts and harm to local economies - are occurring more often, in more places and lasting longer than in past decades.

Harmful Algal Blooms. Phytoplankton (single-celled microscopic algae) exist at the base of the food chain in most freshwater and marine ecosystems.

They capture solar energy and provide food to aquatic animals. There are hundreds of varieties of these microorganisms, and most are harmless. But certain forms can turn toxic if conditions are right.

phytoplankton, diatoms and dinoflagellates, produce harmful toxins in marine waters. Harmful algal blooms have been documented along the coastlines of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans and the Gulf of Mexico.

In freshwater, the most common harmful algal bloom is caused by cyanobacteria, otherwise known as blue-green algae. Blooms of the single cell algae known as phytoplankton are sometimes called red tides, which have been recognized since biblical times.

The phytoplankton may become so numerous that they cause the water to become discolored (i.e., red, reddish. Toxic Marine Algal Blooms. One species of phytoplankton has made a strong appearance in Long Island waters, Alexandrium spp.

Alexandrium spp. has been present in Long Island waters since the s and made its first harmful bloom on Long Island incausing large shellfishing closures in Northport and Huntington Harbors in the Town of Huntington (Northwest Suffolk.

Marine harmful algal blooms (HABs) are mostly caused by single celled algae called phytoplankton. Phytoplankton are abundant in both marine and freshwater ecosystems and are an essential component of aquatic food webs.

Harmful algae are a small subset of species that negatively affect human, animal, and. Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CyanoHABs) have serious adverse effects on human and environmental health. Herein, we developed a modeling framework that predicts the effect of climate change on cyanobacteria concentrations in large reservoirs in the contiguous U.S.

The framework, which uses climate change projections from five global circulation models, two Cited by: Harmful algal blooms (HABs) - blooms that cause fish kills, contaminate seafood with toxins, or cause human or ecological health impacts and harm to local economies - are Available Formats: eBook Hardcover Softcover.

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are serious biological nuisances and become a global epidemic. Marine harmful algal blooms, human health and wellbeing: Challenges and opportunities in the 21st century.

Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the UK, 96(1), 61– CrossRef Google Scholar. Marine and Freshwater Research, 69(1), Cited by: 2. Scientific Assessment of Marine Harmful Algal Blooms. This document assesses the problem of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in our Nation’s coastal ocean and estuarine waters and describes recent advances made by Federal agencies to improve scientific understanding of HABs and our ability to manage them.

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are a major issue in marine, brackish, and freshwater systems worldwide (Hallegraeff, ). Algal blooms are not a new phenomenon and occur naturally in fertile regions (such as the North American prai-ries), with historical accounts of these outbreaks dating back at least two millennia (Carmichael, ).Cited by:   Harmful algal blooms, or HABs, occur when colonies of algae – simple plants that live in the sea and freshwater – grow out of control while producing toxins that can have harmful effects on fish, shellfish, marine mammals, birds and people.

Harmful algal blooms, or HABs, occur when colonies of algae - simple plants that live in the sea and freshwater - grow out of control while producing toxins that can have harmful effects on fish, shellfish, marine mammals, birds and people.

Freshwater Algae of North America: Ecology and Classification, Second Edition is an authoritative and practical treatise on the classification, biodiversity, and ecology of all known genera of freshwater algae from North America. The book provides essential taxonomic and ecological information about one of the most diverse and ubiquitous groups of organisms on .Shellfish contamination from harmful algal blooms (HABs) is both costly and a significant health risk to coastal communities.

Blooms of Pseudo-nitzschia can produce the neurotoxin domoic acid (DA). DA can bio-accumulate in marine shellfish and finfish and be transferred to humans and wildlife through consumption of contaminated seafood (Scholin.Harmful Algal Blooms: A Compendium Desk Referenceprovides basic information on harmful algal blooms (HAB) and references for individuals in need of technical information when faced with unexpected or unknown harmful algal events.

Chapters in this volume will provide readers with information on causes ofHAB, successful management and monitoring programs, control.

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